8 Most Common Causes of Tinnitus

Over the years, I've identified eight main causes of tinnitus that when avoided or removed from your life can help improve your tinnitus dramatically. Ironically, these 8 causes do not affect everyone in the same way. Some people will have no reaction to some of these tinnitus causes, while others will have a severe reaction. There's no clear answer to why this is, but the condition is a growing one with one in five individuals who reach the age of fifty-five suffering from tinnitus.

What is tinnitus?

To understand what causes tinnitus, you first need to understand what tinnitus is. Tinnitus is, very simply, a ringing in the ears when there is no actual sound present. A person with tinnitus will often hear a whistling, humming or ringing in their ears even when there is nothing in the area that is emitting that particular sound. It may be intermittent or last only a short time or never seem to stop. Learn more here.

The part of the ear that is involved with sound is known as the cochlea and is a very complicated organ. Sensory hairs, internal fluid and nerve receptors/nerves can easily be damaged and create a wide range of symptoms. As the cochlea becomes damaged improper input to the brain is received which creates interference that generates a wide range of sound feedback that is inappropriate creating abnormal sounds known as tinnitus.

Environmental causes of tinnitus

Just over half of all tinnitus cases are caused by external influences, which include the following:

  • A loud work environment. A loud work environment that involves the use of power tools, power saws, drills or other noisy equipment may cause temporary bouts of tinnitus. I know of many tinnitus suffers who have attended rock concerts and left with ringing in their ears that may take hours or even days to subside. The longer a person remains in that loud environment, the better their chances will be of developing the condition permanently. These environments can also cause hearing loss. Always wear earplugs when you are in a loud environment, even if it is only going to be for a short time. Mowing the lawn? Wear earplugs.

    Smoking. Contrary to popular belief, there are some external irritants that can cause tinnitus. For example, Nicotine has been proven to be an irritant that can cause someone to develop a ringing in their ears. Smokers may find that their chances of developing the condition may be higher than someone who is a non-smoker. If you're suffering from tinnitus right now, and you're a smoker, please quit as soon as possible. If that's just not an option for you right now, be sure to at least pick up an over the counter tinnitus treatment that will dramatically reduce the ringing in your ears.

    Medications, Prescription Drugs and Food Additives. Other external irritants that can cause tinnitus are over the counter medications and prescriptions. Even something as simple as aspirin can generate tinnitus. I have experienced this throughout my lifetime. I take aspirin only when I absolutely need it. Certain antibiotics and other prescription drugs are also known to cause tinnitus. Two very common ones that have shown to cause tinnitus are quinine and chloroquine which are in malaria medications. Certain diuretics and cancer medications can also cause tinnitus. Although not a drug, NutraSweet has been linked to tinnitus and a whole host of side effects in clinical studies.

 

Physical causes of tinnitus

Ringing in the ears can also have physical causes as well. The five most common physical causes are:

  • Changes in the bones of the middle ear. A person’s ear is made up of several different bones: the malleus, Incus and Stapes. In some individuals, these bones may actually change shape or harden over the years. This process is known as otosclerosis and often runs in the family. This can cause ringing in the ears to begin or, if it has already started, to get worse over time.

    Ear wax. Our ears naturally produce ear wax. If that wax becomes impacted and hard the resulting blockage may cause someone to experience ringing in the ears. I have found that clearing someone’s ear canals before damage can take place can be an ideal way to manage tinnitus and help provide relief from the symptoms.

     

    Natural aging. As a person ages, they may begin to suffer from hearing loss. In some cases, this has caused some of the tinnitus suffers that have reached out to me to begin hearing a ringing or whistling that is characteristic of tinnitus.

    Diseases, illnesses and injuries. There are several medical conditions that can cause tinnitus. These include Meniere's disease, temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ), head or neck injuries, brain tumors, etc.

    Most people don't know if they have Meniere's disease until properly diagnosed. This RARE disease brings on dizziness, tinnitus and ear pressure that can last for a short period of time and then disappears.

    TMJ causes pain in your jaw muscles. With TMJ, you'll often hear a clicking noise when chewing. TMJ has shown to influence your chances of developing tinnitus, so be sure to treat the condition in order to reduce your chances of getting tinnitus.

    Head and neck injuries have also been shown to cause tinnitus, so always wear your helmet when you're out biking and drive safely when you're in your car.

    Believe it or not, but tinnitus can be caused by something as simple as an ear infection. Don't take ear infections lightly they can be devastating at any age.

    Brain tumors, while equally as rare as Meniere's disease, can also generate tinnitus symptoms. While you can alleviate your tinnitus immediately with an over the counter tinnitus treatment, you should also seek the help of a tinnitus specialist in your area to determine what the underlying cause of your tinnitus is.

     

    Vascular issues. Some people have blood vessels near their ears that are capable of causing tinnitus. I have found that if the blood pressure is elevated, this increased pressure can cause that dreaded ringing in your ears or even a whooshing sound. Because pregnant women often have elevated blood pressure, they are easily susceptible to tinnitus. Tinnitus caused by pregnancy should go away with an over the counter tinnitus treatment and once the baby is born. An overactive thyroid has also been shown to causes vascular issues that bring on tinnitus.


In conclusion

If you're suffering from tinnitus right now, then first and foremost you want to just get rid of the ringing in your ears. This can and should be achieved by getting an over the counter tinnitus remedy.

Next, if you've identified any tinnitus causes from the list above that may be causing your tinnitus, then you're going to have to make some lifestyle changes to avoid making your tinnitus worse.

And if your tinnitus does not improve after taking an over the counter tinnitus treatment, be sure to seek out the help of a local tinnitus specialist to determine what the underlying cause of your tinnitus is.

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